Tag Archives: train

Active Exercise Recovery

You train hard and recovery is an important part of that program.  Recovery is important for many reasons.  Recovery allows the body time to adapt to a workout program.  It allows time for the body to repair tissue that has been damaged working out as well as replenishing depleted energy stores.  It also allows the body the rest required to keep from over training and eventually burning out.

Active recovery really means a day off – from your program.  That means that you take a day to live your life actively or doing a workout that is less intense.  This could be walking the dog, enjoying a yoga class, going for a swim or bike ride, hiking, stretching, or even grabbing a foam roller for some much needed self-myofascial release (SMR).

Rest and relaxation refers to the down time away from training altogether, allowing the body the needed time to do those tissue repairs, strengthen, and replenish.

 


Finding Time

You’ve packed your bag the night before, filled your water bottle, packed the kid’s snacks and booked her into child-minding.  She wakes up with a fever.  Sigh.

You got all of your paperwork filed, you’ve had your morning snack and have a packed lunch to eat at your desk after a lunch-time run. Your phone rings, and it’s a client crisis that just can’t wait.  Sigh.

No matter what the scenario that you’re hit with, the one thing that gets missed in your day always seems to be you.  For a workout veteran, this can be disappointing, frustrating, changing the mood and course of your entire day.  For a rookie, this can be catastrophic, completely derailing your momentum.

How can you combat this?  Here are five not-so-average body weight exercises that you can do at home or in the office with absolutely no equipment.  Before you even begin, take a moment and focus awareness on your posture.  Hold your core in tight (belly button towards your spine), open up your chest and pull your shoulder blades back.  Bring your chin up and tuck your pelvis under just a bit to protect your lower back.  OK, let’s go!

1. Sumo-SquatTargets the Leg Adductors (inner thigh) – Start with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, toes pointing out towards “10 and 2 o’clock”.  Raise your hands out in front of you as a counter-balance, and push your glutes (bum) backwards, bending at the knee.  Be sure to keep your knees behind your toes and your head up.  If you feel a strain in your lower back, come back to your starting position and reset your posture.  Every time you get to the top of your range of motion, squeeze your glutes tight.

2. Plank Jack/Jump JackTargets the Core, Leg Adductors, Shoulders – Start in a prone plank position, on either your hands or elbows, knees or toes.  Hop your legs out laterally and back in, come to a standing position and up for a jumping jack.  Come back into that starting plank position and repeat.  Be sure to watch that your glutes don’t pop up into the air, as that essentially deactivates your abdominal recruitment.  To make this lower impact, walk out 1 leg at a time in both positions.

3. Roll-OversTargets Oblique Abdominals (Core) – Starting on your stomach, stretch out your arms and point your toes.  Roll over onto your back without using your arms/hands to assist you.  Roll back onto your stomach in the other direction.

4. Plank Kick-BacksTargets the Core, Glutes – Start in a prone plank position, on either your hands or elbows, knees or toes. Tighten your glutes (bum muscles) and slowly lift your leg upwards and back towards the ceiling.  Alternate sides.  Be aware of hip positioning and try to keep the pointy bones on either side of your pelvis (ASIS) pointed down towards the ground. This will help to keep your hips from rolling open to the side

5. Incline or Decline Push-Up Targets the Pectorals (chest) – Start with a basic push-up.  You can do this on either the knees or the toes.  Come down to the floor as low as you can go, and push your body weight back up.  If you’re on your knees, try to keep the fleshy spot just above your knee cap in contact with the floor.  This will keep your hips and glutes down enabling your core to stabilize your body.  Incline: have your hands positioned 6-12 inches higher on a platform.  The higher up you are, the easier the push-up becomes.  Decline: place your feet up on a platform, with hands on the ground.  When progressing from a knee push-up to toe, start with incline, progressing to flat or decline push-ups.

To add intensity, jog on the spot or add a set of jumping jacks in between each exercise. 

No Excuses left, let’s go!


Visit to YMCA Partnership in Ukraine

YMCA builds healthy communities not only in Calgary, but also in more than 120 countries around the world through our International Initiatives. Partnerships promote sharing of knowledge and resources with YMCAs in other parts of the globe and provide opportunity to support local community development work abroad. Together with other YMCAs in Alberta, our partnership with YMCA Ukraine promotes mutual growth and learning.

View a couple snapshots from Tanis Cochrane, YMCA Calgary’s VP of Children and Youth, who is currently visiting Ukraine to help train young leaders.

Sofia and Leysia, from our YMCA partnership in Ukraine

Hot Chocolate you eat with a spoon in Lviv, Ukraine

 


What Youth Can Learn from the Financial Crisis

Check out this article by David Paltin, Child Pyschiatrist, on the Child Development Institute website all about teaching children & teens about finances and using the recession to explain key concepts on budgeting:

“The statistics on the problem are staggering — 1 in 3 high school teens use a credit card, the average debt of an entering college freshman is $1,585. According to the 2010 Junior Achievement and Allstate Foundation survey of teen finance, 42 percent of teens who do not budget their money do not want to learn about budgeting, while 74 percent of teens say they will have a credit card by the time they enter college. Can we assume that our kids have learned anything from the recession and economic crisis, or have we missed one of the most ”teachable moments” of their lives?”

Read the full article on the Child Development Institute website.


New LRT near Saddletowne YMCA

Calgary transit’s new northeast LRT expansion has officially opened in the far northeast.

 The line travels through Martindale and Saddleridge to end up near Saddetowne Circle and the Genesis Centre of Community Wellness which houses Saddletowne YMCA! It’s now even easier to get fit and healthy at YMCA!

Click here to find out more details on Global TV Calgary news.


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