Category: YMCA News

National Indigenous History Month 2022


 

The month of June is National Indigenous History Month, a month to recognize and celebrate the history, culture, and diversity of the First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people of Canada. On June 21, the summer solstice, Canada celebrates Indigenous Peoples Day with hundreds of events and festivities to recognize the many achievements of Indigenous People in Canada.

 
At YMCA Calgary we are proud to work with Indigenous children, youth, and families through programs that support cultural identity, leadership, and recreation. As we reflect on the important work we have ahead with respect to truth and reconciliation, we welcome you to join YMCA Calgary on that journey and take some time in June to participate in upcoming activities and learning opportunities both within the YMCA and the broader community.
 
We will be hosting outreach events at our branches throughout the city and will be collaborating with Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth (USAY) to deliver an interactive virtual reality experience featuring an Elder guided journey through Writing on Stone Provincial Park.
 
Branch Event Schedule (Virtual reality experience at events listed w/ USAY):

  • June 13 Branch Outreach Event from 10 a.m. – 12 at Melcor YMCA at Crowfoot
  • June 14 Branch Outreach event w/ USAY from 2 p.m. – 6 at Shane Homes YMCA at Rocky Ridge
  • June 15 Branch Outreach Event from 8 a.m. – 12 at Remington YMCA in Quarry Park
  • June 16 Branch Outreach Event w/ USAY from 2 p.m. – 6 at Brookfield Residential YMCA at Seton
  • June 23 Branch Outreach Event w/ USAY from 2 p.m. – 5 at Saddletowne YMCA
  • June 24 Branch Outreach Event from 8 a.m. – 12 at Shawnessy YMCA

 
Community events:
Aboriginal Awareness Week Calgary (AAWC) will be hosting several free events:

  • Indigenous Variety Showcase on Sunday, June 19, from 1 – 4 p.m. at Studio Bell National Music Centre (Free admission, must register online here)
  • National Indigenous Family Day & POW WOW on Saturday, June 25, from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. at Calgary Stampede Grounds – South Park (Free admission, open to the public)

 
Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth (USAY) will be hosting their Treat7 & Trivia Launch Event featuring Elder prayer and traditional dancers, singers and drummers.

  • Monday, June 20th, from 2 p.m. – 5 at Fort Calgary

 

We are looking forward to celebrating and sharing knowledge with you throughout Indigenous History Month.


YMCA Ukraine Wristband Campaign


 

YMCA Ukraine Update: May 13, 2022

 

YMCA Ukraine and YMCA Calgary have been partners for 15 years, working together to share ideas with a common goal – to make our communities better for future generations. Our shared priority now is to support urgent humanitarian needs abroad as well as support refugees as they come to Canada.

 
Recent updates from Viktor Serbulov, National General Secretary of YMCA Ukraine, shared how through donor support they are purchasing and transporting food, diapers, hygiene products, and clothing across Ukraine, as well as offering activities for children and families and mental health support to attempt to ease people’s minds on the current realities as well as keep them connected to one another.
 
In March, Local Laundry supported those affected by the war in Ukraine with the release of a limited edition zip-up hoodie. 100% of profits from the Ukraine zip-up sweater is going to YMCA Calgary, which is sending the funds to our partners in Ukraine to assist people in leaving the country, finding safe shelter, and providing warm blankets, personal hygiene products, basic aid items, and medical supplies. We are happy to share that they raised over $5,238.87 in support of YMCA Ukraine.
 

YMCA Ukraine Wristband Campaign

To continue to raise awareness and much-needed funds, YMCA Calgary is selling YMCA Ukraine wristbands at all YMCA facilities across the city. You can show and give your support by purchasing a wristband at member services for a minimum $5 donation with 100% of the donation going to YMCA Ukraine. Any gift over $20 is eligible for a tax receipt.

 

You can also make a donation directly to Ukraine below:

 
Donate today  
 
Thank you for your continued support!


Red Dress Day and the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit+ People (MMIWG2S+)


 

May 5 marks the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit Peoples+ (MMIWG2S+) in Canada. It coincides with Red Dress Day.

 
Red Dress Day began in 2010 as art installation called The REDress Project by Jaime Black, a multidisciplinary artist of mixed Anishinaabe and Finnish descent. The project has been installed in public spaces throughout Canada and the United States, with red dresses acting as a visual reminder of the staggering number of murdered and missing Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people who are no longer with us, and a way to draw attention to the gendered and racialized nature of these violent crimes.
 
Violence against Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit+ Peoples in Canada today must be understood within the framework of Canada as a settler colonial state. The longstanding impacts of residential schools, the pass system, the 60s scoop, and ongoing acts of colonization such as resource theft and disproportionate underfunding of vital services often result in Indigenous women, girls, Two-Spirit, and gender diverse people having less access to supports, safety, and lives free from violence.
 
A RCMP report that estimated more than 1,200 Indigenous women and girls had either been murdered or vanished since the 1970s. The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) estimates that the number is actually nearer to 4,000 but due to incomplete data, the number is hard to determine.
 
On Red Dress Day, many show their solidarity by honouring those we have lost and their families, denouncing the ongoing colonial, racialized, and gendered violence being waged against MMIWG2S+ Peoples, and taking action to stop the violence. This may include:

  • Reading about the 231 individual Calls for Justice in the Final Report of the National Inquiry;
  • Considering how you as an individual and the YMCA as an organization can contribute to the 231 Calls for Justice, including the 8 Calls for Canadians;
  • Wearing red on May 5;
  • Using a virtual background on May 5 that recognizes Red Dress Day;
  • Using hashtags on social media to raise awareness, such as: #MMIWG, #MMIWG2S, #RedDressDay, #WhyWeWearRed, and #NoMoreStolenSisters;
  • Hanging a red dress in a visible space; and
  • Continuing to learn more and take action (see Additional Resources for Learning and Action below).

 
If you’d like to learn more and take action to stop the violence, here are some resources:
💻 Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) Resources
🎥 Video: Canada Must End Genocide of Indigenous Women & Girls Now – Pam Palmater
📣 KAIROS Canada – Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Advocacy & Action
🔊 KAIROS Canada – Their Voices Will Guide Us: Student and Youth Engagement Guide
💟 Amnesty International – No More Stolen Sisters: What Can I Do?
📚 UBC: Featured Books, Media and Performing Art Expressions on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, & Two-Spirit (MMIWG2S)
 
#WhyWeWearRed #MMIWG2S


YMCA Calgary Launches Live Arts Series “YMCA Presents”

First-in-Canada arts series to bring the best in live performance to Calgary communities in 2022

 
Beginning in May, YMCA’s Seton and Rocky Ridge locations will be alive with the sound of music, as YMCA Calgary launches “YMCA Presents”, a YMCArts series that will bring the best in professional performers into Calgary’s communities for live performances in 2022. The series will kick off with “When You’re Smiling”, a special concert featuring the Tim Tamashiro Jazz Quartet – making their first cross-Calgary tour to perform in both YMCA theatres – May 7 @ 7:30 at the Evan Hazell Theatre (Brookfield Residential YMCA at Seton) and May 14 @ 7:30 at the BMO Theatre (Shane Homes YMCA at Rocky Ridge).
 
“When You’re Smiling” will be a callback to the rat pack led by extraordinary Calgarian jazz musician and arts champion Tim Tamashiro (known across Canada as the former host of CBC’s main stem jazz program “Tonic”). Tamashiro is all set to sing and narrate the musical stories of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr., three of the most talented rascals ever to put on tuxedos. The Tim Tamashiro Jazz Quartet will take audiences on a thoroughly entertaining musical journey celebrating the remarkable trio’s friendship, songs, and stories. Performances will take place cabaret-style with a full bar; tickets are $30 for members and $32 for non-members (with discounts for full tables).
 
The initiative comes from YMCA Calgary’s belief that the opportunity to explore and develop our creative selves should be available to everyone. YMCA Calgary is the first YMCA in Canada to expand its spaces and integrate core arts programming. In addition to this performance series, YMCA Calgary will offer engaging, professional, and accessible creative programming to all ages in locations across Calgary classes and camps will include dance, music, drama and visual art.
 

“Art and creativity are significant contributors to our well-being and success as humans,” said Shannon Doram, President & CEO at YMCA Calgary. “We have a long history as a trusted charity in the Calgary community and believe that layering in creative pursuits alongside physical ones has the power to boost potential in people of all ages.”

 
The YMCA Presents live performance series is hosted in two state-of-the-art theatres, the BMO Theatre in Shane Homes YMCA at Rocky Ridge, and the Evan Hazell Theatre in Brookfield Residential YMCA at Seton.
Upcoming shows include:
 

  • When You’re Smiling – Tim Tamashiro Jazz Quartet (May 7 & 14)
  • Al Simmons’ Inventive Musical Comedy (October 15 & 16)
  • Nutcracker (In A Nutshell) (December 10 & 11, and Dec 17 & 18)

 
Find out more at ymcacalgary.org/arts.


Support Ukraine Hoodie Partnership with Local Laundry


 

YMCA Calgary and apparel company, Local Laundry, have teamed up to support those affected by the war in Ukraine with the release of a limited edition bamboo zip-up hoodie.

 
100% of profits from the Ukraine zip-up sweater will be donated to YMCA Calgary, who will facilitate the donation to the YMCA’s in Ukraine who are assisting people in leaving the country, finding safe shelter, and providing warm blankets, personal hygiene products, basic aid items and medical supplies.
 

The Ukraine Zip-Up Sweater is strictly our response to the crisis and a way for us to give back and involve our community at large in the ability to support struggling people in and fleeing Ukraine by supporting a local initiative. We felt it was our responsibility to release a garment that allowed our community of Locals to feel like they could direct donations, support and efforts to the war happening in Ukraine.Connor Curran, Co-founder of Local Laundry
 
Over the last 15 years, YMCA Calgary has worked together with YMCA Ukraine with the common goal – to make our communities better for future generations. Our shared priority now is to support urgent humanitarian needs abroad as well as supporting refugees as they come to Canada. The Ukraine Zip-Up Sweater provides a way for customers to support charity with a direct impact.
 
 
The YMCA Ukraine teams are dealing with an evolving humanitarian crisis in Ukraine – and they need our support now more than ever. We’re grateful for the leadership and generosity of Local Laundry to help us raise awareness and funds for YMCA Ukraine.Shannon Doram, President & CEO, YMCA Calgary
 

Available until March 31st, all Ukraine Zip-Up Sweater orders will go into production starting April 1st.

 


In Support of Ukraine


 
Our hearts are heavy as we watch the situation in Ukraine unfold and we know we are not alone.
 
YMCA Calgary is committed to supporting our Ukrainian colleagues – international partners that we consider as our extended family. Over the last 15 years, we have worked together to share ideas with a common goal – to make our communities better for future generations. We are committed to creating safe places of belonging for all and reflecting our shared collective values of caring, respect, honesty, responsibility.
 
We are also mindful that within our Calgary community, many people are also impacted and devastated by the reality of this conflict. Our colleague and friend Viktor Serbulov, National General Secretary of YMCA Ukraine has shared updates from Kiev, explaining the current situation and impact on the people across the country.
 
YMCA Europe on LinkedIn: Messages from Ukraine: Viktor Serbulov – Posted February 27, 2022
 
If you are able, click here to donate to YMCA Europe and to learn more about the Global YMCA’s collaborative efforts to support Ukraine.


Celebrating Black History Month in Child Care


 

By Nwamaka Amadike (Amaka)

 
My name is Amaka, and I am a Nigerian Canadian. I am also the Director of Shane Homes YMCA at Rocky Ridge Child Development Centre since its inception. Along with my fellow Black colleague as my supervisor… We believe we’ve made a first in the history of our YMCA Calgary. Here, along with Caryl our GM, and Jackie my manager, we’ve worked hard to create a diverse team that we are very proud of.
 
Black History Month provided an opportunity to showcase some of our team members from the black community. Why may you ask? I am glad you asked. That means that you are still reading…great! Events such as this can easily lose meaning without any concrete activity to mark them. Such events can quickly fall off people’s consciousness and become boring, doing the motions, or checking the box scenario. Secondly, visibility matters a lot on issues of minority representation. It is important for the YMCA community to see that there are people from the Black community who work at the Y in different positions of responsibility. Minorities can become invisible in organizations and highlighting and giving them a voice can be a huge step in showing recognition. Representation also motivates others to action. It is important that the Y’s Black community realize that they have people who look like them that are visible and that they can look up to for inspiration.
 


 
And to lighten and spice up the mood, we chose to appear in our cultural attires, which can hardly be worn in Calgary of course (cold weather), but we thought we’d share with you anyway. We organized some diversity-themed activities with the children to mark Black History Month. We used arts, crafts, etc. to teach the children about positive elements of diversity in Canada. We believe that teaching children at a young age about diversity will provide the right foundation to be tolerant and create inclusive-minded adults in the future. Our celebration enabled the educators to share the core values of respect, caring, and responsibility with the children.
 
As an early years educator, we have a duty to educate the next generation about inclusion and diversity and what it means in our practice by using age appropriate materials and language and most of all, by being involved. I am proud to say that this event presented a great opportunity for learning and growth for the children in our centre as well as the educators. We hope to celebrate our cultural heritage on an ongoing basis and not only in February.


Our Thoughts Are with Ukraine


 
YMCA Calgary considers our international partners and colleagues from YMCA Ukraine as part of our extended family.
 
As part of our active involvement in the World Alliance of YMCAs, we directly partner with the YMCA in Ukraine and Bogotá, Colombia to exchange expertise, resources, and share ideas.
 
Over the last 15 years, we have worked together to share ideas with a common goal – to make our communities better for future generations. They have been leaders in youth engagement and demonstrate an incredible commitment to building community through volunteer efforts.
 

 
We have been receiving regular updates from the YMCA Ukraine team at the national office and can share that they have been optimistic and resilient while experiencing heightened stress and anxiety. Just days ago, the team was holding an international workshop on the topics of conflict prevention and resolution, psychosocial resilience, and employability in crisis situations.
 
We share their hopes for peace and keep them in the forefront of our thoughts.


Black History Month Events

 

As we celebrate and acknowledge the diverse culture, rich heritage, and impactful accomplishments of the Black Community in February during Black History Month, we want to showcase a number of local events, seminars and resources that you can participate in, learn, and be inspired to action. This list was compiled from resources provided by Action Dignity, University of Calgary, Calgary Library and Alberta Health Services.

 


Violet King: A Calgary Trailblazer

Today we are sharing the history and legacy of Violet King, a Calgary born trailblazer with a unique YMCA connection. Her name is Violet King.

Violet King was born October 18, 1929, in Calgary, Alberta. A descendant of American settlers, King’s grandparents arrived in Keystone, AB (now known as Breton, AB) in 1911. King’s parents later moved to Calgary and settled into the Hillhurst – Sunnyside neighbourhood. Violet was one of four siblings and attended high school at Crescent Heights High School, knowing at a very young age that she wanted to be a criminal lawyer, as stated in her grade 12 yearbook.
 

(courtesy Glenbow Archives/NA-5600-7760a)

 
Violet King went on to study law at the University of Alberta in 1948. The Faculty of Law at the U of A was male-dominated, and King was one of only three women enrolled. Violet showed a keen interest in leadership and public relations and got heavily involved with various clubs and the student union. During her undergraduate, King’s contributions were recognized, and she was awarded an Executive “A” gold ring, a prestigious honour she shares with future Alberta Premier, Peter Lougheed (1971-1985).
 
Life in Alberta presented several challenges for the King family. When King’s grandparents arrived in Canada, the Canadian government proposed a Ban on Black American Immigration to Canada, therefore limiting Black immigrants in the Canadian Prairies to 1,000 people in 1912. Violet’s brother, Ted, was the president of the Alberta Association for the Advancement of Coloured People from 1958 to 1961, and in 1959 he launched a legal challenge against a Calgary hotel’s discriminatory policy, bringing to light the legal loopholes innkeepers exploit to deny Black patrons lodging. In a 1955 speech at a sorority banquet in Calgary, King expressed hope that in the future greater focus would be placed on a person’s ability and less on one’s race or gender, in a way, a formal declaration of her mission and purpose.
 


Violet King receiving recognition from the Calgary local of the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (IBSCP), June 1954.

(courtesy Glenbow Archives/NA-5600-7757a)

 
Following her graduation, King was actively involved in supporting and promoting the rights of Black workers, using her knowledge of racial barriers faced by Black men and becoming treasurer of the labour union, the Calgary Brotherhood Council. Violet King was called to the Alberta Bar on June 2, 1954, becoming the first Black female lawyer to practise law in Canada. King practised law in Calgary for several years, working for a firm and later a judge of the Court of Appeal of Alberta.
 
King moved east to Ottawa where she worked with the federal department of Citizenship and Immigration, giving her the opportunity to travel the country and meet various leaders of different service and community associations. Throughout her career, she gave speeches discussing racism and her hopes for gender and race equity.
 
In 1963, King moved to the United States and settled in New Jersey to become the executive director of the Newark YMCA’s community branch, where she assisted Black applicants seek employment opportunities. In 1969, King moved to Chicago to become director of manpower, planning and staff development with the YMCA. In 1976, she was appointed executive director of the National Council of YMCA’s Organization Development Group, making her the first woman named to an executive position with the American national YMCA organization.
 
King passed away on March 30, 1982, from cancer at the age of 52. Her legacy as a trailblazer is recognized as being a strong advocate for women and racial equality, as demonstrated by her significant leadership qualities and contributions. Violet King shattered both glass ceilings and racial barriers throughout her life and her legacy is an example to us all for the work and community building we must do and continue to do for many generations to come.
 


On February 26, 2021, the Federal Building Plaza in Edmonton was renamed the Violet King Henry Plaza to honour her numerous contributions and legacy.

(courtesy Gabriel Mackinnon Lighting Design)

Sources:
Violet King
Retrieved from https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/violet-king
 
Violet King shattered both glass ceilings and racial barriers
Retrieved from https://www.ualberta.ca/law/about/news/2021/2/violet-king.html
 
Criminal Justice Firsts: Violet King
Retrieved from https://www.ryerson.ca/criminaljusticefirsts/courts/Violet-King/
 
Plaza renamed to honour trailblazing Black Calgarian
Retrieved from https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-black-violet-king-henry-lawyer-1.5929853


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